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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes found in the catalog.

Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes

Michael D. Bordo

Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes

an historical appraisal : tables and figures

by Michael D. Bordo

  • 95 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • International finance -- History -- Tables.,
  • Gold standard -- History -- Tables.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMichael D. Bordo.
    SeriesWorking paper series -- working paper no. 4310, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 4310.
    ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22439236M

    The Bretton Woods Gold Standard and the Beginning of Monetary Chaos. When delegates from all 44 of the Allied nations gathered near the end of World War II in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, they made decisions that they thought best for the world’s primary industrial states, such as tying the various currencies among its members to the U.S. dollar, which in turn was tied to the value of gold.   The gold standard is a monetary system where a country's currency or paper money has a value directly linked to gold. With the gold standard, countries agreed to .

    a) exchange rates were revalued in the Bretton Woods agreement. b) exchange rates have been allowed to float. c) the United States returned to a gold standard. d) the zone of monetary stability has been limited to the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.   The Gold Standard and Related Regimes by Michael D. Bordo, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(3).

    from the Gold Standard to the Euro. The pace is rapid. The theoretical chapters. set up the role of money in the economy in seventy tightly argued pages. The. empirical review of the gold standard, the Bretton Woods system, the European. Monetary System and the European Monetary Union, each of . o Fixed exchange rate regime: nations pegged their currencies to gold; • Ounce of gold = $ or ounce of gold= pounds o Hegemon (U.K.) stabilized the "Gold Standard" regime" o Extremely stable framework, but has a lack of flexibility in monetary policy o The system will .


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Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes by Michael D. Bordo Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Gold Standard, Bretton Woods and other Monetary Regimes: An Historical Appraisal Michael Bordo. NBER Working Paper No.

(Also Reprint No. r) Issued in April NBER Program(s):International Finance and Macroeconomics, Development of the American Economy, Monetary Economics. This paper provides answers to two Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes book.

Michael D. Bordo, "The gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes: a historical appraisal," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar. The Bretton Woods system gave nations more flexibility than strict adherence to the gold standard.

It also provided less volatility than a currency system with Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes book standard at all. A member country still retained the ability to alter its currency's value, if needed, to correct a "fundamental disequilibrium" in its current account balance.

You didn't specify how much depth you wanted in terms of history, economic theory, policy applications, etc. Here are some book suggestions that are accessible for the average reader. The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dext.

Alternative Monetary Regimes: The Gold Standard Anna J. Schwartz. Chapter in NBER book Money in Historical Perspective (), Anna J. Schwartz (p. - ) Lessons of the Gold Standard Era and the Bretton Woods System for the Prospects of an International Monetary System Constitution:Cited by: Get this from a library.

The Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes: an historical appraisal. [Michael D Bordo; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Book Reviews A New Global System. Naomi Lamoreaux and Ian Shapiro, eds.

The Bretton Woods Agreements Yale University Press, New Haven and London,pp., $ This useful collection of basic documents and essays marks the 75th anniversary of.

This book contains a collection of Michael D. Bordo's essays written singly and with colleagues on the classical gold standard and related regimes based directly or indirectly on gold convertibility.

The gold standard (and its variants) was the basis for both international and domestic monetary arrangements from the third quarter of the /5(2).

The Gold Standard, Bretton Wood and Other Monetary Regimes: A Historical Appraisal by Michael D. Bordo The author first examines empirical evidence on the performance of three monetary regimes: the classical gold standard, Bretton Woods, and the current float.

The gold standard (and its variants) was the basis for both international and domestic monetary arrangements from the third quarter of the nineteenth century until when President Nixon closed the US gold window, effectively ending the Bretton Woods International Monetary by: 9.

Get this from a library. The Gold standard, Bretton Woods and other monetary regimes: an historical appraisal. [Michael D Bordo; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: This paper provides answers to two questions.

The first question is which international monetary regime is best for economic performance. One based on fixed exchange rates: including the. A gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is based on a fixed quantity of gold standard was widely used in the 19th and early part of the 20th century.

Most nations abandoned the gold standard as the basis of their monetary systems at some point in the 20th century, although many still hold substantial gold reserves.

Representatives of some 44 nations gathered in July at Bretton Woods, a resort spot in New Hampshire, to hammer out a world monetary system, replacing the. Some economists said comply with the gold standard had prohibited monetary authorities from increasing the money supply rapidly enough to recover the economies.

Therefore, the representatives of most of the world’s leading nations met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, in to create a new international monetary system. A new gold standard tied to the U.S. dollar would ensure stability in White’s view. Ultimately White’s ideas led to the creation of “the three so-called Bretton Woods institutions: the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), and the World /5().

Two books – one from and the other from A great pair I can tell you. Monetary Theory and Bretton Woods, Filippo Cesarano, Cambridge, Wow – what a book. One of the four books I annotated most – the others being Does IT Matter.

Nation of Takers and Dealing with Darwin. Since I have been delving into Bretton Woods and its aftermath, I had to dig deeper and understand. Some economists said adherence to the gold standard had prevented monetary authorities from expanding the money supply rapidly enough to revive economic activity.

In any event, representatives of most of the world's leading nations met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, in to create a new international monetary : Mike Moffatt. Under the Bretton Woods System, gold was the basis for the U.S.

dollar and other currencies were pegged to the U.S. dollar’s value. The Bretton. Gold exchange standard. The Bretton Woods System was established after World War II and was in existence during the period Inrepresentatives of 44 nations met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, and designed a new postwar international monetary system.

This system advocated the adoption of an exchange standard that. price of a fine troy ounce of gold was $ ( + = ). In all countries with a gold standard, prices of gold were set in terms of the country’s national money unit-dollars, pounds, marks, francs, and other monetary units.

Each government was committed to buying gold from the public at its fixed price and to converting the gold into. American politicians, meanwhile, assured the rest of the world that its currency was reliable by linking the US Dollar to gold; $1 equalled 35 oz.

of bullion. In effect, this arrangement replaced gold with US$. In other words, the Bretton Woods system made US$ as good as gold. Keep in mind that the United States was mostly unscathed by the.Rajesh Kumar, in Strategies of Banks and Other Financial Institutions, Gold exchange standard.

The Bretton Woods System was established after World War II and was in existence during the period Inrepresentatives of 44 nations met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, and designed a new postwar international monetary system.The Bretton Woods system was drawn up and fixed the dollar to gold at the existing parity of US$35 per ounce, while all other currencies had fixed, but adjustable, exchange rates to the dollar.

Unlike the classical Gold Standard, capital controls were permitted to enable governments to stimulate their economies without suffering from financial.